May 30, 2024

IT (continued): Another collaboration was with Arizona-based artist Jeff Davis. We traveled to Chartres, France, where we visited the Chartres Cathedral and Atelier Loire. This third-generation stained glass workshop is known for its restoration work on both Notre-Dame and Chartres Cathedrals. Atelier Loire’s library of colors and glass is amazing. It was a moment of pure joy and inspiration. There, we sampled a piece and gained an understanding of the color range and the physical constraints of the medium. This knowledge then informed the algorithm we used to create our own beautiful, self-standing stained glass sculptures.

 

Our process always begins with physical craft. The tangible informs the digital, which then comes back into the physical world. Our collections come full circle, and I might be a little biased since I was involved, but I truly believe they’re beautiful and a pioneering exploration of generative art’s potential.

TRAME unveils generative interiors, blending algorithmic design and traditional craftPortraits by Martin Grasser

 

 

IT (continued): Generative art has existed for a while and creating generative art on the blockchain emerged as a breakthrough. Like any digital creation, blockchain gives art authenticity, provenance, and credibility. These technical advancements allowed digital art to be traded, and so on. However, most of the collections you might read about in traditional media, referring to NFTs as art, were purely digital. Now, through this artistic journey, as Jaime mentioned, we’re combining generational craftsmanship with generative art. It’s a whole new territory for this art form, a world championship in uncharted lands.

TRAME unveils generative interiors, blending algorithmic design and traditional craft
Portraits by Martin Grasser

 

 

DB: In recent years we’ve noticed a growing fatigue with purely digital art in favor of a renewed love for traditional, handcrafted processes. It’s exciting to see this blend — the future with its developing technology meeting the love that designers have for creating things with their hands.

 

IT: At Milan Design Week 2022, we showed a collection of 3D printed clay at Alcova. Coming from a family that does ceramics, my generation bridges the gap by 3D printing clay. It’s a new form of digital craftsmanship, and I’m super proud of it. We previewed the collection at the Institut du Monde Arabe in Paris, before we took it to Alcova. We had phenomenal success there. Now, we’re moving forward, keeping craftsmanship at the heart of tomorrow’s creation.

DB: The next generation of designers is seeming to reject ubiquitous plastic while maintaining an interest in 3D printing itself.

TRAME unveils generative interiors, blending algorithmic design and traditional craft
Portraits by Martin Grasser (process)

 

 

DB: How did these traditional craftsmen respond to your projects for Generative Interiors?

 

IT: Some craftspeople, threatened by what they don’t understand, resist change. But the best are truly curious and embrace it. They’re eager to learn and innovate. For them, this is really exciting. Coming from a family of artisans myself, I understand their perspective. When I created collections in Morocco in 2020, I did the glazing myself — prepping the mixture, firing the pieces, and retrieving them the next day. This hands-on experience let me communicate with them effectively, building trust, which is crucial.

Seeing their creations displayed in stunning interiors and acquired by prestigious collectors, along with the well-deserved recognition they receive, strengthens this bond even further. It allows us to expand and explore new possibilities. These are the use cases that bridge the gap for the next collection in a different category.

TRAME unveils generative interiors, blending algorithmic design and traditional craft
Navette by Alexis André (process)

 

 

DB: What do you see in the future?

 

JD: As our world becomes increasingly digital and AI pervades every aspect of life in the coming years, ensuring the longevity of human craft and techniques is really important. The human touch, be it from a creative or manufacturing perspective, will only become more valuable as technology advances. We’re really excited to help contribute to that.

 

DB: Are you using AI in your process, or will these collections remain strictly algorithm based?

 

JD: We haven’t used AI, I’ve been calling it ‘human coded, handcrafted.’ There’s a human touchpoint at every intersection of what we do.

TRAME unveils generative interiors, blending algorithmic design and traditional craft
Optimism by Jeff Davis (studio)

 

 

DB: What are your views on AI?

 

IT: AI, like code-based art, phones, social media – is what we make of it. What truly excites me is how AI can expand human abilities and creativity. Open source AI itself isn’t the biggest opportunity, in my view. It’s individuals – artists, brands, maybe even AI companies — who can leverage their creative minds with AI, just like calculators expanded our ability to calculate.

 

Remember the drama around calculators being banned from math exams? Now, calculators are accepted — we use them alongside our own knowledge. I believe AI will follow a similar path. 

 

We need to find the right balance, ensure it enhances our humanity, not replaces it. With algorithmic art, I’ve already explored how to maintain human craftsmanship. But how can AI directly apply to my work? That’s a question I’m still exploring.

 

 

1/6

Navette by Alexis André (process)

Navette by Alexis André (process)

Enlace by Aranda\Lasch (process)

Enlace by Aranda\Lasch (process)

Enlace by Aranda\Lasch (process)

Enlace by Aranda\Lasch (process)

Optimism by Jeff Davis (studio)

Optimism by Jeff Davis (studio)

Optimism by Jeff Davis (process)

Optimism by Jeff Davis (process)

Portraits by Martin Grasser

Portraits by Martin Grasser

project info:

 

exhibition title: Generative Interiors

gallery: TRAME | @trameparis

collections: ‘Enlace’ by Aranda\Lasch, ‘Navette’ by Alexis André, ‘Optimism’ by Jeff Davis, ‘Portraits’ by Martin Grasser


link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *