May 22, 2024

Designers have long relied on visual aids to help convey their creative vision. While 3D renderings aren’t new, they have become a powerful tool in the design process and the technology continues to advance. Case in point, ALL3D: a company that creates shockingly realistic renderings. To put their tech to the test, we asked five interior designers—Serena Dugan, Heather Peterson, Kiyonda Powell, Nadia Watts, and Anita Yokota—to reimagine the same bedroom in different ways. The only requirement: embrace the pattern-on-pattern trend. Each space was virtually brought to life based on their mood boards and product selections, and the results will make you wish you could jump right into the screen—sort of like a cartoon leaping into a painting.

As we enter a pattern-on-pattern renaissance, these 3D renderings showcase the revival with a 2024 mindset. From drenching an entire room in a single print to mixing and matching motifs, the current love of layering patterns diverges from last year’s quiet luxury mania. Below, explore the bedroom designs for inspiration. The best part? Many of the rooms’ wallcoverings, fabrics, and accents are real items you can bring into your home to recreate the look.


User Guide: Drag the image around to experience the virtual room.


a person wearing a dress

Spacecrafting Photography

House Beautiful: What inspired your design?

Heather Peterson: We love wallpaper, so we started there to set the tone. The house is traditional but new. We used a historic Pierre Frey Braquenié paper that has a traditional floral base but with a surprisingly modern vine layered over it. It feels a bit like a comic book “zap!” The palette is fresh and surprising, and we repeated the coral and sage in our other textiles—including a Japanese-inspired linen on the bed and curtains and an updated jacquard on the bench. We also mixed in both muddy and electric tones that don’t match the wallpaper to ensure the space feels collected more than designed.

In addition to our mix of textiles, we also incorporated pattern on case pieces. The painted florals on the cabinet, inlaid floral on the side table, and even the ribbed fronts of the nightstands add to the lively layers. We strongly believe that no room is complete without art, and we love these photographs from Minnesota-based artist Alec Soth. They’re a collaboration with Gucci. The prints add an edge—and yes, even more pattern!

Don’t forget that patterns can come in categories other than textiles.

HB: Describe the room you designed in three words.

HP: Layered, collected, and irreverent.

HB: What do you like most about the pattern-on-pattern trend?

HP: The interplay of patterns is so dynamic, personal, and very forgiving. In a new build, layered patterns are a quick way to impart soul. In an old house, it’s a great way to distract from imperfections.

HB: Can you share any tips for designing around this trend and choosing complementary patterns/colors?

HP: In this room, we used the wallpaper as our “hero” pattern. It contains most of the colors in the room. Rather than matching the colors exactly, we chose textiles in the same color family but made sure they were a step or two off in hue and or saturation. This adds depth to the overall palette. With so much movement in the wallpaper, we tempered it with more structured patterns, like the skinny stripe on the ceiling and the bohemian geometrics of the curtains and bedding. Solids can give some relief, too.

To keep things from feeling matchy, we also made sure to bring in colors not represented in the paper, like the lilac of the rug. When you have a lot of patterns at play, it can also be nice to use repetition. One strategy is to have the draperies match the walls, but in this case, we employed the drapery fabric on the four-poster bed. With the bedding, we repeated the print on both the coverlet and all the pillows. We used another pattern in the same color on the throw pillow, keeping the surface of the bed as one strong unit within the scheme.

Don’t forget that patterns can come in categories other than textiles. Here, the antique Swedish cabinet, marble inlay side table, intricate shell mirrors, and contemporary photography are all patterned, too!

HB: What role do you think technology like this will play in the future of design?

HP: I was honestly shocked at how good this rendering is. While I have mixed feelings about sharing whole-room renderings with clients (it steals the magic when they know exactly what it will look like), I see this as an incredibly useful tool for designers to see what is missing from a scheme and to play with the impact of items in space. I could also see it as a sales tool for particularly hard-to-imagine items, like the impact of a fabric on the ceiling or a particularly large-scale light—both of which we have here!

a bedroom with a bed and a couch

All3D

a room with a fireplace and a window with curtains

All3D

a couple of chairs in a room

All3D

a room with a large painting on the wall

All3D

a bedroom with a bed and a couch

All3D

User Guide: Drag the image around to experience the virtual room.


kiyonda powell

Rhonisha Dione

House Beautiful: What inspired your design?

Kiyonda Powell: I was introduced to the quilts of Gee’s Bend over 20 years ago by someone who gifted me a set of postcards with these beautiful works. The patterns they create lean toward modern and abstract, and the color palettes are fresh. Many of them I consider timeless.

I also drew inspiration from my obsession with plaids and checks. They are some of my favorite patterns. I love how they can be layered to create tension and art. I love bold colors and patterns, but I intentionally wanted this to feel softer and more feminine with a modern edge.

HB: Which pattern did you start with?

KP: The Faune et Flore embroidered fabric from Pierre Frey bonded the color palette. I ended up using it as a part of the bedding, and I love the scenic pattern inspired by the banks of the Nile River in juxtaposition to the geometric patterns used with the headboard, canopy, and wallcovering.

HB: Describe the room you designed in three words.

KP: Harmonious, sentimental, and delightful.

HB: What do you like most about the pattern-on-pattern trend?

I love pattern play. I love layers. It’s thoughtful and intentional while at the same time can feel effortless. It’s not for the faint of heart or the timid. There is a strong sense of confidence and knowing yourself that comes with playing in patterns. I don’t consider it a trend but more of a preference or lifestyle. Pattern play is always a good time, so I’m happy to share how I love to use it.

I love pattern play. I don’t consider it a trend but more of a preference or lifestyle.

HB: Can you share any tips about designing around this trend and choosing complementary patterns/colors?

KP: It’s more of a feeling for me. I like to craft a story. The narrative helps me to develop the design. Contrast thrills me, so I had to show some restraint to achieve the look. For this bedroom suite, I wanted a softer look. I wanted the energy to be harmonious, so the colors had to be similar. The exception was adding the teal/green for a little contrast and interest. I also played with scale by finding a large-scale pattern wallcovering, which gave me a sense of plaid and modernity.

HB: What role do you think technology like this will play in the future of design?

KP: 3D visuals are a huge selling tool for design. The quality and realism are unmatched and help to accurately tell the design story or intention. As we advance within technology, it will become the expectation to illustrate design in this way.

a bedroom

All3D

a room with a table and chairs

All3D

a fireplace with a painting on the wall

All3D

a room with a painting on the wall

All3D

a room with a table and chairs

All3D


User Guide: Drag the image around to experience the virtual room.


text

Courtesy of Serena Dugan

House Beautiful: What inspired your design?

Serena Dugan: The wallpaper [Jakarta in the dill colorway] is new, and I’m slightly obsessed with it. I wanted to see a room that was enveloped in this pattern and rich coloration to create a mood and feeling of the print, not just a visual.

HB: Describe the room you designed in three words.

SD: Rich, enveloping, and green.

HB: What do you like most about the pattern-on-pattern trend?

SD: It’s expressive and allows you to be playful when designing. With pattern-on-pattern, odd combinations are interesting. There are no wrong answers. Permission is a wonderful thing when decorating!

HB: Can you share any tips for designing around this trend and choosing complementary patterns/colors?

SD: I generally like to pull out one or more of the colors from each pattern and reflect it in my next pattern. I lay them next to one another and see how they speak to one another. I add a third pattern in this manner and either a conversation emerges or it doesn’t. Stay open and play with possibilities, using this as a guideline. Also, choose a dominant pattern that will anchor the room. When using other patterns sparingly, reflect the colors in other spots in the room to balance it out.

Permission is a wonderful thing when decorating!

HB: What role do you think technology like this will play in the future of design?

SD: It is clear that technology is continuing to evolve at a pace that’s exceeding our habits. I know that I can’t even imagine what’s possible and how we’ll end up using technology in design. What is clear is that the application of technology in design is absolutely powerful and will be an incredible aid in visualizing, modeling, and presenting concepts going forward.

a bed with a blue and white comforter

All3D

a bed with a blue and white comforter

All3D

a table with a lamp and a lamp on it

All3D

a room with a table chairs and a window with curtains

All3D

a room with a fireplace and a window with curtains

All3D


User Guide: Drag the image around to experience the virtual room.


anita yokota

Courtesy of Anita Yokota

House Beautiful: What inspired your design?

Anita Yokota: Drawing from my background as a therapist, my design inspiration was deeply rooted in promoting mental well-being and facilitating restorative rest. I envisioned a space that seamlessly combined elements of vintage charm with modern sophistication, creating an environment that fosters relaxation and rejuvenation. The color palette was carefully curated to evoke feelings of tranquility and calm, with soothing tones of soft blues, greens, and earthy blush neutrals. These colors were chosen not only for their aesthetic appeal but also for their therapeutic properties, providing a sense of serenity and comfort conducive to mental health pause moments and restorative sleep.

HB: Which pattern did you start with?

AY: I began with a captivating wallpaper [from York Wallcoverings] featuring a bold bird motif as the jumping-off point for the design. This wallpaper served as the focal point of the room, inspiring the selection of complementary patterns and colors that harmonized with its vibrant yet calming aesthetic. I really enjoyed the movement it gives to the room with the birds flying.

The color palette was carefully curated to evoke feelings of tranquility and calm.

HB: Describe the room you designed in three words.

AY: Vibrant, energizing, and soothing.

HB: What do you like most about the pattern-on-pattern trend?

AY: What I find most appealing about the pattern-on-pattern trend is its ability to inject energy and visual interest into a space. By layering different patterns, textures, and colors, it creates a dynamic and personalized ambience that reflects the unique personality of the person living in the room.

HB: Can you share any tips for designing around this trend and choosing complementary patterns/colors?

AY: Start with a focal pattern and build around it, ensuring a balance of scale and visual weight. Consider the color palette of each pattern and aim for cohesion through shared hues or complementary tones. Mix patterns of different scales (like large florals with small geometrics) to create contrast and visual depth. Incorporate solid colors or neutrals to provide breathing room and prevent overwhelming the space. Experiment with textures and finishes to add dimension and tactile interest to the design.

HB: What role do you think technology like this will play in the future of design?

AY: Technology has already revolutionized the design industry, offering tools and platforms for visualization, collaboration, and innovation. In the future, I believe technology will continue to empower designers by providing advanced 3D rendering capabilities and virtual reality experiences. This will enable designers to explore new creative possibilities, streamline the design process, and ultimately enhance the client experience. Additionally, technology will play a crucial role in sustainability efforts within design, facilitating the use of eco-friendly materials and energy-efficient solutions.

a large bed in a room

All3D

a couch by the window with a side table

All3D

a large bed in a room

All3D

a room with a mirror and a dresser

All3D

a couch by the window with a side table

All3D

User Guide: Drag the image around to experience the virtual room.


nadia watts

Courtesy of Nadia Watts

House Beautiful: What inspired your design?

Nadia Watts: Flora and fauna! Biophilia was top of mind for this project as I was in the midst of joining the committee for Luncheon By Design in Denver, featuring this amazing biophilia exhibit at the Denver Art Museum. I live in Colorado and nature has always been an inspiration. The idea of being intertwined with the natural world speaks to me. It’s the perfect starting point for design inspiration.

HB: Which pattern did you start with?

NW: The Porter Teleo wallcovering and the window coverings in The Gem Collection, which I created with Kravet, are where it all began. I fell in love with the large-scale pattern on the paper and then went with contrasting stripes on the ceiling by Sanderson and zig-zags on the draperies by Kravet. The biophilia shines in the paper. The geometric stripes and zig-zags perfectly complement the nature-inspired wallcovering.

Pattern-on pattern forces you out of your comfort zone, and the results are always unique.

HB: Describe the room you designed in three words.

NW: Whimsical, comfortable, and unique.

HB: What do you like most about the pattern-on-pattern trend?

NW: Pattern-on pattern forces you out of your comfort zone, and the results are always unique. It’s such an active and curious way to design a room. The “let’s try it and see” approach is so much fun. The pattern-on-pattern trend opens up so many possibilities. It broadens the creative process, which is always a treat.

HB: Can you share any tips for designing around this trend and choosing complementary patterns/colors?

NW: This trend thrives under an analogous color scheme. Choosing colors from the same family will help your patterns feel purposeful and curated. So choose a palette and stick to it. Your room will thank you for it. I like to use a mix of natural, free-flowing patterns with more structured geometric patterns. Also, keep scale in mind. You want to vary your scale with an assortment of small, medium, and large-scale prints.

HB: What role do you think technology like this will play in the future of design?

NW: This has been a huge year for technology in the design world. Having a tool that allows you to show your design concepts in such a tangible way is a game changer. Technology is making design more accessible for people, allowing them to see a space as the creative vision comes together.

a couch with stools and a side table by a window

All3D

a fireplace in a room

All3D

a wall with a painting on it

All3D

a bedroom with a bed and a dresser

All3D


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