July 24, 2024

For our latest lookbook, we’ve chosen eight nightclubs that utilise clever construction methods and aesthetic solutions to execute elevated interiors with grand fittings and lavish fixtures.

The nightclub interiors, which range from an underground bunker in Beirut to a PVC inflatable in Geneva, spotlight ambitious designs that prioritise audiovisual quality and user experience through contemporary takes on accessibility and performance.

This is the latest in our lookbooks series, which provides visual inspiration from Dezeen’s archive. For more inspiration, see previous lookbooks featuring gallery-like living rooms with sculptural furniture pieces and neutral-hued homes with herringbone flooring.


Klymax nightclub dance floor
Photo by Tommaso Riva

Klymax, Indonesia, by OMA

Located at the Potato Head resort in Seminyak, Bali, this sleek interior with teak veneer panelling was arranged around a 208-square-metre sprung dance floor.

Architecture studio OMA implemented a floating DJ booth and speakers with thick concrete padding engineered to avoid rattling.

Find out more about Klymax ›


Interior of B018 nightclub
Photo by İeva Saudargaitė

B018, Lebanon, by Bernard Khoury

Beirut’s underground bunker nightclub B018 was given a complete overhaul in 2019, with architect Bernard Khoury replacing original wooden furniture with gothic stone booths and podiums.

Referencing religious architecture and abattoirs, Khoury added a macabre row of skeletal metal rods hanging from the centre of the nightclub as lighting fixtures. Walls, floors, ceilings and furniture are all finished in stone.

Find out more about B018 ›


Supernova dance floor
Photo by James Gerde

Supernova, USA, by Mutuus Studio

Set within a timber warehouse building, this inclusive art and entertainment space is arranged around a giant disco ball that contains the DJ booth.

The hemispherical booth sits in the centre of a nine-metre-long stage and is accompanied by suspended audiovisual equipment and flashy diamond-patterned lighting arrangements.

Find out more about Supernova ›


Interior of Public Records nightclub
Photo by Cody Guilfoyle

Public Records, USA, by Shane David

Musician Shane David turned a historic Brooklyn building into a “music driven social space” called the Sound Room. The interiors are dark and moody with perforated plywood panels cladding the walls for strong acoustics.

Other sound engineering details include wooden walls that were cut on a CNC router, and a contoured ceiling meant to diffuse sound.

Find out more about Public Records ›


Interior of 2 WEEKS nightclub
Photo by Tony Elieh

2 Weeks, Lebanon, by Rabih Geha Architects

Layers of perforated webbed black steel divide up the industrial interiors of this downtown Beirut nightclub, separating the main bar, DJ booth and seating area.

Clubbers must walk around the outside of 2 Weeks’ container-like walls, informed by the shipping containers of its New Waterfront Area location, to enter via a gap in the steel partition.

Find out more about 2 Weeks ›


Interior of Shelter in Switzerland
Photo by Dylan Perrenoud

Shelter, Switzerland, by Bureau A

Commissioned by the Federation of Swiss Architects, this intimate inflatable nightclub is made out of black PVC membrane that can be easily deflated and transported due to its lightweight structure.

Named Shelter, the building created by studio Bureau A contains a bar and a dance floor that contains an assortment of inflatable furniture including seating, tables and a DJ booth.

Find out more about Shelter ›


Interior of Silencio NYC nightclub
Photo by Pauline Shapiro

Silencio NYC, USA, by Crosby Studios

At Silencio NYC, gold accented metal panels, curvy built-in seating, rich-red velvet curtains and cinematic red lighting were designed to pay homage to the club’s original location in Paris, which was designed by director David Lynch.

Mirrored walls create the illusion of extended space in the nightclub, which was also informed by Studio 54.

Find out more about Silencio NYC ›


The Prada Double Club Miami dance floor
Photo by Casey Kelbaugh

The Prada Double Club Miami, USA, by Carsten Höller

Belgian artist Carsten Höller designed this Miami pop-up nightclub for fashion brand Prada, with opposing identities and aesthetics dictating both internal and external spaces.

Contrary to the colourful neon aesthetic created for outside, the club’s entirely monochromatic interiors fed into unique grayscale approaches to lighting and furniture that honoured the glory of its former 1920s film studio location.

Find out more about The Prada Double Club Miami ›

This is the latest in our lookbooks series, which provides visual inspiration from Dezeen’s archive. For more inspiration, see previous lookbooks featuring gallery-like living rooms with sculptural furniture pieces and neutral-hued homes with herringbone flooring.

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